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The Incredibly Refreshing and Umami Watermelon & Goat Cheese Salad - the Best Thing for the Summer



This watermelon & goat cheese salad is surprisingly umami and amazingly refreshing - it’s perfect for the summer! Here’s the recipe:


Half a watermelon

1 bunch of parlsey

1 bunch of fresh mint

2 red onions

2 limes

1 lemon

Goat cheese or feta

A handful of olives

A punnet of blueberries


1. Chop the 2 red onions and soak them in lime and lemon juice for at least 20 minutes to remove the sharpness. They become salty and sweet.

2. Soak the blueberries, parsley and mint in filtered water with a tablespoonful of baking soda for at least half an hour to remove pesticides then rinse.

3. Chop the watermelon into large chunks and put them into a salad bowl.

4. Add a handful of olives

5. Chop the goat cheese or feta into small cubes

6. After soaking, remove the rough stems and chop the parsley and mint. Add them to into the salad bowl.

7. Pour the chopped onions together with the lemon and lime juice.

8. Add the blueberries.

9. Use your hands to mix the salad from the bottom.

10. Garnish the salad with cubes of goat cheese or feta.


No salt or oil is needed. Enjoy!


Watermelon is full of electrolytes which make it incredibly rehydrating and the lycopene that is in the red substance is what will protect your skin from sunburn. Freeze the watermelon skin afterwards and rub it onto your face and all over the body after a sunbathing session because the white of the skin is actually more nutritious than the red flesh of the watermelon. It’s filled with Vitamin C and it’s super refreshing!


Here’s what the Medical Medium has to say about watermelon, melons and parsley:


Watermelon is an excellent fruit that effectively hydrates, detoxifies, and cleanses the entire body on a cellular level. It is rich in vitamins A and C as well as lycopene, beta-carotene, lutein, and zeaxanthin which are excellent for providing protection from lung, mouth, pancreatic, breast, prostate, endometrial, and colon cancer.


Watermelon is also known to significantly reduce inflammation, help flush out edema, aid in weight loss, and alleviate depression. Watermelon can also boost the immune system as well as strengthen vision. Watermelon is not nearly as high in sugar as most people think as it has half the sugar than an apple.


Watermelon is loaded with antioxidants that have the ability to neutralize free radical molecules and aid in the prevention of chronic illnesses. The rind of the watermelon is equally beneficial as it is one of the highest organic sodium foods in nature and one of the best sources of chlorophyll and can be juiced for a delicious and healing drink.

And, if you are lucky enough to get a watermelon with black seeds, even better! Crunch those seeds up too, they have an amazing effect on the nervous system, aiding in relaxing the body and lowering blood pressure and contain helpful amounts of iron, zinc, and protein.


Melons are so critical to the healing process that when someone is struggling with a health condition and can’t get better, the outcome may very well hinge on whether or not melon is part of her or his diet. Watermelon, honeydew, cantaloupe, crenshaw, canary, Santa Claus, galia, charentais, casaba—they are all keys to the palace of health. Ask yourself how many melons you’ve consumed in the past year. It may be hard to figure out, because you’re probably used to having a slice here, a bite there, often alongside other food.

For most people, the answer is that over the past 12 months, they’ve only eaten one melon in total, if that. This is a major loss. Why? Because melons are made just for us by God and the Earthly Mother. They are like mother’s milk, only one step further, because melons are predigested—meaning that melon flesh is so assimilable that our digestive systems barely need to process it when it enters the body, because it is so high in enzymes and certain coenzymes as yet undiscovered by science that strengthen them. The fructose in melon leaves the stomach in less than one minute, then the rest of the fruit drops directly into the intestinal tract, immediately fortifying and replenishing the body.


Eating melon is like getting intravenous nutrient therapy. On every level, including biochemically, melon is exactly what our bodies need. Melons are essentially balls of purified water. This highly active fluid binds onto poisons of all kinds in the body, including mold, mycotoxins, viral neurotoxins, undigested protein toxins, ammonia gas, and bacterial toxins, flushing them out to allow the immune system to restore itself. Further, the fruit’s high electrolyte content helps protect the brain and the rest of the nervous system from stress-related strokes, aneurysms, and embolisms. Melon thins the blood and reduces heart attack risk, helps prevent heart disease and vascular issues, and can even reduce liver and kidney disease—if someone is suffering from liver or kidney malfunction, melon can mean the difference between life and death.

The water in melon is nearly identical to our blood, and its sodium, potassium, and glucose are also abundant and bioavailable, making melon one of the most hydrating foods you can eat. This hydration is critical, as it helps to lower high blood pressure, among other benefits. Melon is one of the most alkalizing foods. The fruit’s highly bioavailable and bioactive trace mineral count is responsible for driving electrolytes higher than normal, making them easily usable by the body. In return, the body’ detoxification processes become amplified, driving out traces of DDT, other pesticides, herbicides, and heavy metals from deep within the organs. High in silica, melon is an excellent food to restore ligaments, joints, bones, teeth, connective tissue, and tendons. Melon is also one of the most powerful glucose balancers, working to prevent insulin resistance and lower elevated A1C levels.


CONDITIONS

If you have any of the following conditions, try bringing melons into your life:

Mystery infertility, Crohn’s disease, colitis, peptic ulcers, Barrett’s esophagus, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), low reproductive system battery, aneurysm, embolism, stroke, heart attack, heart disease, liver disease, cirrhosis of the liver, liver cancer, kidney disease, breast cancer, pancreatic cancer, pancreatitis, tendonitis, epilepsy, sepsis, osteoporosis, H. pylori infection, multiple sclerosis (MS), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Addison’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), diabetes, hypoglycemia, acne, depression, anxiety, herpes infection, urinary tract infections (UTIs), transient ischemic attack (TIA), heavy metal toxicity, E. coli infection, yeast infections, mold exposure


SYMPTOMS

If you have any of the following symptoms, try bringing melons into your life:

Constipation, low hydrochloric acid, stomach pain, upset stomach, poor circulation, accelerated aging, dental issues, food allergies, connective tissue inflammation, tremors, shakes, seizures, weakness, blood sugar imbalances, chronic dehydration, acidosis, joint pain,bone density issues, kidney pain, back pain, spasms, twitches, slurred speech, blurry eyes, inflammation, food sensitivities, anal itching, blisters, blood toxicity, insulin resistance, brain fog, body stiffness, brittle nails, chronic nausea, fever, itchy skin, leg cramps


EMOTIONAL SUPPORT

If you are easily frightened, having a difficult time bearing bad news, or dealing with a heavy load due to emotional sensitivities or PTSD, melons can come to your aid by shifting you out of any nervousness, skittishness, anxiety, or uneasiness. And if you’re eagerly awaiting news, melons can give you the extra support and patience you need during the process. Offer melon to a friend or family member who you feel has no patience, or whose judgments and opinions are stumbling blocks. Your gift could ease that person’s energy and open up a channel so that she or he becomes more accepting.


SPIRITUAL LESSON

The predigestion miracle of melon teaches us that powerful processes can be in play without us even realizing. We don’t have to fight tooth and nail for every good thing in life. Sometimes good comes to us without our labor: Powerful healing takes place in our bodies, spirits, and souls, and all we have to do is let it happen. Situations made for us present themselves, and all we have to do is grab the opportunities. Allow for this type of grace in your daily life.


TIPS

  • To reap melon’s benefits, try eating at least half of a small melon per day.

  • Predigestion is the reason that you may associate eating melon with getting a stomachache. Since melon moves so quickly through the digestive tract, it can get held up and start to ferment in the gut if eaten with denser foods, or on the same day that you’ve eaten a heavy meal. Melon is best eaten as the first meal of the day, either on its own or accompanied by fresh vegetable juice.

  • Different melons take varying amounts of time to ripen. A sweet aroma and a little bit of give on the blossom end are good indications that most melons are ripe.

Though it could technically be grouped with the other aromatic herbs, parsley is in a class of its own because of its skill at alkalizing all the body systems. You’ve no doubt heard of the concept of body acidity and alkalinity—that when the body becomes acidic, disease can occur. Well, wherever parsley is sold, it should come with a sign that says, “Fights acidosis more than anything else.” Normally, alkalizing foods only have the ability to promote alkalinity in one or two body systems, so other systems can remain acidic. Used appropriately and on a regular basis, parsley can alkalize the entire body, crossing body systems and driving out acidity across the board. (Note that pH strips don’t give you the feedback on body acidity that you may think they do. For more on this, see the “Harmful Health Fads and Trends” chapter.) Mineral salts are a large part of what makes parsley so alkalizing—parsley’s specialized mineral salts bind onto unproductive acids in the body to drive them out. This alkalizing skill makes parsley helpful for preventing and battling every type of cancer.


The herb is an all-purpose pathogen-fighter; it keeps bacteria, parasites, and fungus at bay. Parsley is amazing for anything mouth-related such as gum disease, tooth decay, and dry mouth, as it impedes the growth of unproductive microorganisms there. It’s also a fantastic anti-DDT weapon—it has a great chelation effect that pulls out stores of herbicides and pesticides such as DDT that you never knew were hiding in your body and holding you back. Parsley is full of nutrition, including B vitamins such as folic acid, traces of B12 coenzymes, and vitamins A, C, and K. It’s also a highly remineralizing food, especially for those low in trace minerals; parsley provides magnesium, sulfur, iron, zinc, manganese, molybdenum, chromium, selenium, iodine, and calcium.


Parsley is practically a wild food, as it doesn’t need much tending to fare well and provide for you; it can even handle some colder weather, meaning that it has an adaptogenic nature. When you eat it, parsley passes this will to survive and thrive along to you. Parsley is an excellent herb to replenish you when you’re depleted and exhausted. Like licorice root, though it doesn’t usually make the lists of top adrenal boosters, parsley most definitely should.


CONDITIONS

If you have any of the following conditions, try bringing parsley into your life:

All types of cancer (especially blood cell cancers such as multiple myeloma), torn cartilage, phobias, anxiety, depression, gum disease, salivary duct problems, thrush, adrenal fatigue, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) mononucleosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), migraines, thyroid disease, urinary tract infections (UTIs), Addison’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, arthritis, arteriosclerosis, atrial fibrillation, cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD),endocrine system disorders, hepatitis C, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), bipolar disorder, Lyme disease, narcissistic personality disorder, fatty liver, ringworm, Sjogren’s syndrome


SYMPTOMS

If you have any of the following symptoms, try bringing parsley into your life:

Nausea; lightheadedness; dizziness; acidosis; loss of smell; loss of taste; malaise; abdominal pain; tremors; gum pain; dry mouth; headaches; weight gain; nosebleeds; tooth decay; gum recession; cavities; all neurological symptoms (including tingles, numbness, spasms, twitches, nerve pain, and tightness of the chest); mineral deficiencies (including trace mineral deficiencies); chemical sensitivities; inflammation of the uterus, ovaries, and/or fallopian tubes; memory loss; poor circulation; pre-fatty liver; shortness of breath; brain lesions; spinal lesions; tooth pain


EMOTIONAL SUPPORT

When you feel like you’re on an emotional roller coaster, turn to parsley. The herb grows in such a way that the stems and leaves on the outside mature first, and new growth continues in the center—so it’s a very centered and centering herb. If you feel like you’re being dragged along on someone else’s emotional roller coaster, offer her or him a dish with parsley in it. When a person gets enough of this herb, you’ll notice a more balanced state of mind and being.


SPIRITUAL LESSON

Too many people miss out on the health benefits of parsley because they’re not wild about the flavor. It’s not an allergy or an intolerance—they just decide to stick with what they know and love. When we don’t like something, even if we know it’s good for us, we tend to avoid it. What experiences, conversations, situations, responsibilities, and actions are you avoiding in your life that would ultimately help you? What valuable lessons are you missing out on? What benefits would you reap if you put aside your initial aversion and approached something you usually think of as unpleasant as an opportunity instead?


TIPS

* One excellent way to enjoy and benefit from parsley is to juice it with celery. The mineral salts in these related herbs work in tandem, with the parsley’s salts binding onto acids such as lactic acid in the body and driving them out while celery’s salts bind onto other sorts of toxins while also feeding and helping to form neurotransmitter chemicals (of which there are many varieties as yet undocumented by medical research).

* You can also make a tea from parsley, using the herb fresh or dried (though preferably fresh).The infusion process is a great way to extract the maximum amount of trace minerals and phytochemicals hidden deep within parsley, so that you can absorb these nutrients.

* For maximum benefit, seek out flat-leaf parsley. (Curly-leaf parsley still has great value, so don’t skip it if flat-leaf isn’t available.)

* Get into the habit of adding parsley to everything, whether you like the herb or not. At a certain point, habit will take over, and in the end, you’ll at least be using parsley in one meal a day. If you’re averse to parsley, experiment with it in various preparations (juiced, chopped and sprinkled on salad, blended into a smoothie, made into tea, and so on) until you find one you can tolerate. Then you can reap parsley’s nutritional benefits while it also pushes out what shouldn’t be in your system.





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